The BOC Blast 365 – Update to United States Mexico Canada Agreement

Update to United States Mexico Canada Agreement

After 25 year, the old North American Trade Agreement will be replaced tomorrow July 1, 2020. Each participating country has its own name, yet all three names refer to the same trade agreement. Please see the name for each country listed below. 

  • United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), in the United States
  • Tratado entre Mexico, Estados Unidos y Canada (T-MEC), in Mexico.
  • Canada-United States-Mexico Agreement (CUSMA), in Canada.

US Customs and Border Patrol issued a cargo systems messaging service with the final instructions. Please see CMSM# 43215543 US-Mexico-Canada Agreements (USMCA) Implementing Instructions (Final) – July 30, 2020. The CSMA published by Customs lists the website were you can find specific information for importing under USMCA. BOC will provide a Certificate of Origin that contains all the data elements that are required for USMCA, T-MEC and CUMA with instructions, to any party requesting it.  

Cargo Systems Messaging Service CSMS #43215543
US-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) Implementing Instructions (Final) – June 30, 2020

This message is to inform the Trade Community of the release of the USMCA Implementing Instructions (Final) on June 30, 2020.  The link to this document is available below.

These USMCA Implementing Instructions replace the Updated USMCA Interim Implementing Instructions issued on June 16, 2020, and provide guidance on the new requirements under the USMCA, including information on USMCA entry, compliance, rules-of-origin, origin certifications, new auto requirements, textile requirements, and other requirements for claiming USMCA preferential treatment for goods.

The supporting USMCA regulations, the new Part 182 of Title 19, Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR 182) that includes the USMCA Uniform Regulations, will be issued on July 1, 2020.  Additionally, the Harmonized Tariff Schedule of the United States will be amended effective, July1, 2020 to include General Note 11 (GN11) with information on the USMCA rules of origin, product specific rules, and other requirements.

Effective July1, 2020, the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) terminates and the USMCA enters into force.

Questions regarding this guidance can be directed to Maya Kamar, Director, Textiles and Trade Agreements Division at (202) 945-7228 or email FTA@CBP.DHS.GOV.

Questions regarding the USMCA automotive certification submission process for Labor Value Content certification, Steel certification, and Aluminum certification can be directed to the USMCA Center email at USMCA@CBP.DHS.GOV

The USMCA Implementing Instructions – June 30, 2020

https://www.cbp.gov/document/guidance/usmca-implementation-instructions

The USMCA Implementation Act (Public Law No: 116-113)

https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/5430/text

The USMCA Agreement, Final Text

https://ustr.gov/trade-agreements/free-trade-agreements/united-states-mexico-canada-agreement/agreement-between

USTR Federal Register Notice on USMCA Alternative Staging Regimes for Automotive Imports – 85 FRN 22238, April 21, 2020

https://www.govinfo.gov/content/pkg/FR-2020-04-21/pdf/2020-08405.pdf

CSMS #43197567 – USMCA Post-Importation Claims and MPF Processing

https://content.govdelivery.com/bulletins/gd/USDHSCBP-293247f?wgt_ref=USDHSCBP_WIDGET_2

The BOC Blast 364 – Rolled Trans-Pacific Shipments Portend

Rolled Trans-Pacific Shipments Portend

Sporadic Capacity Scarcity

Bill Mongelluzzo, Senior Editor | Jun 08, 2020 7:47AM EDT, JOC online

An unexpected surge in Asian exports to the United States in late May, causing cargo rolling at Asian ports and a spike in rates, warns of future pockets of tight capacity as shippers cautiously increase volumes and carriers plan blank sailings into August.

Tensions are rising between non-vessel operating common carriers (NVOs) and shipping lines as NVOs charge that carriers are intentionally restricting capacity and overbooking vessels in the eastbound trans-Pacific in order to push freight rates higher. For their part, carriers blame the tight capacity on their customers’ inability to accurately forecast demand during the COVID-19 crisis.

Regardless of the cause, the tensions speak to larger trends in the container shipping industry, namely carriers’ successful management of capacity to meet future volumes and general uncertainty among importers of just how much restocking is needed as the North American economy recovers from the pandemic. These conditions are expected to continue in the coming months.

Carrier executives this week told JOC.com that the tight outbound capacity at Chinese ports resulted from an unexpected late-May spike in US imports. Volumes are increasing as retailers begin to replenish inventories of merchandise that have been moving out of warehouses to store shelves as the US economy begins to reopen.

“Everyone missed the volume surge,” in their projections, a liner executive that asked not to be identified said Wednesday. “We rely on our customer forecasts,” he said.

As a result, rates from China to the US West Coast are unusually high right now, especially given the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on US imports from Asia.

Blank sailings reduce capacity in eastbound trans-Pacific. NVOs, however, charged that the spike in the West Coast rate is due mostly to carriers restricting capacity from South China to the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach through blank sailings. Carriers this past month have blanked 36 sailings in the trans-Pacific, according to Sea-Intelligence Maritime Consulting. At the same time, import volumes have increased the past two weeks as some regions of the country reopened businesses that were closed during COVID-19 lockdowns.

“The country is opening faster than expected,” Jon Monroe, a transportation consultant who represents NVOs in Asia and the US, said in a newsletter to clients on Thursday. Carriers are managing space so tightly through blank sailings that there is a two-week backlog in South China ports for shipments destined to Los Angeles-Long Beach, he said.

For weeks 23-24 (beginning June 1 and June 8), vessel capacity in the Pacific Southwest services from South China to California is “extremely tight,” Monroe said. “All steamship lines are overbooked now.” Monroe described space on services to the Pacific Northwest and all-water strings from China to the East Coast as “tight.”

In conversations with JOC.com, carrier sources bristled at those statements from NVOs and said their decisions to cancel sailings at Asian ports, which were announced three to five weeks in advance in order to give customers time to adjust their supply chains, are based on feedback they receive from their customers.

“We have zero visibility into the supply chain on the customer side,” one carrier executive said.

A second carrier executive that asked not to be identified told JOC.com this week carriers in March and April made good-faith supply-demand forecasts in a volatile market that has been roiled by COVID-19. “There was no premeditated plan to prop up rates,” the executive said.

Jeremy Nixon, CEO of Ocean Network Express, told JOC Uncharted Wednesday that ONE is attempting to go beyond demand forecasts from customers in an effort to refine its capacity plans even further.

“If we only use forecast information four to five weeks out, we’d have some bumps in the road. But we’re using some simulation work and we’re trying to adjust some of these forecasts to make them more accurate,” Nixon said.

When US containerized imports from Asia plunged in March and April, carriers were planning their sailing schedules a month or so forward, the carrier executives said. Because they were given no insight into retailers’ plans for replenishing their inventories in May, they determined that in order to control costs, they would have to cancel sailings.

Anticipating a slow start to the peak-shipping season that runs from August through October, trans-Pacific carriers since April have canceled more than 120 sailings into July, according to Sea-Intelligence. Retailers likewise are expecting a slow summer shipping season.

The BOC Blast 363 – Additional List 4A Products Excluded from China Tariff; Act Now for Retroactive Refunds

Capacity Cut by Blank Sailings

The international trading industry continues to face challenges.  It is reported that the shipping companies suspended a large volume in May and June, leading to container freight rates rising. Ports and the container shipping industry will continue to be under pressure in the coming months.

Due to the impact of the pandemic on global trade, according to data provided by Alphaliner, as at May 11, the number of global container ships standing idle has reached 524, with a total idle standing capacity of 2.65 million TEU. It is equivalent to 11.3% of the global container shipping capacity. It has become the highest in history.

The shipping companies have announced the cancellation of a total of 478 voyages, of which 350 voyages are mainly on deep ocean routes.

TRANSATLANTIC NETWORK SEASONAL BLANK SAILING PROGRAMME UPDATE

MSC Mediterranean Shipping Company would like to inform you that in order to respond to lower demand due to the increased impact of COVID-19 across Europe and the USA, we will continue our seasonal blanking programme.

The temporary suspension of our NEUATL4 service will be extended till week 28.

(NOTE: Rotation affected by MSC NEUATL service is: Antwerp – Rotterdam – Bremerhaven – Felixstowe – New York – Savannah – Port Everglades – Charleston)

The programme will continue with the followed omissions:

  • Week 24 omission – Blanking vessel voyage 024W – ETD Antwerp 08.06.2020 
  • Week 25 omission – Blanking vessel voyage 025W – ETD Antwerp 15.06.2020
  • Week 26 omission – Blanking vessel voyage 026W – ETD Antwerp 22.06.2020
  • Week 27 omission – Blanking vessel voyage 027W – ETD Antwerp 29.06.2020
  • Week 28 omission – Blanking vessel voyage 028W – ETD Antwerp 06.07.2020 

You may continue to place bookings with limited disruption as we are arranging a contingency plan with alternative services.

Should you have any questions regarding these blanking, please contact your MSC local office.

Week# Alliance Carrier (Service String) Gateway Blank Sailing Details Alterative Update
22 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (AWE2), OOCL (ECX2),
APL (AW1), CMA (Manhattan Bridge),
EMC (NUE2)
EC – (P) M/V CMA CGM J.Madison
ETD TAO 05/25
ETD NBO 05/28
ETD SHA 05/31
ETD BUS 06/01
ETA NYC 06/25
Added
04/24 2020
22 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (CPNW), OOCL (PNW4),
APL (NP2),CMA (TPX),
EMC (PE2),
PNW M/V XIN HONGKONG
ETD HKG 05/27
ETD YTN 05/29
ETD NBO 06/01
ETD SHA 06/03
ETA PRR 06/14
Resume to Normal Revised
05/08 2020
22 The Alliance *YML, Hapag, ONE, HMM  (PS4) PSW M/V TBA
ETD XMN 05/30
ETD YTN 06/01
ETD KAO 06/02
ETD KEE 06/03
ETA LAX  06/16
Resume to Normal Revised
05/15 2020
23 2M+Zim *ZIM (ZCP), MSK (TP10),MSC (Amber Jack)
Hamburg (ASUS1),
EC – (P) M/V CAPE TAINARO
ETD XNG 06/05
ETD TAO 06/07
ETD NBO 06/09
ETD SHA 006/11
ETD BUS 06/14
ETA SAV 07/08
Added
04/24 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (AWE2), OOCL (ECX2),
APL (AW1), CMA (Manhattan Bridge),
EMC (NUE2)
EC – (P) M/V
ETD TAO 06/01
ETD NBO 06/04
ETD SHA 06/06
ETD BUS 06/08
ETA NYC 07/02
Added
04/24 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (GME)
CMA (GMX), EMC (GME), OOCL (GCC2)
EC – (P) M/V Cosco Auckland
ETD SHA 06/01
ETD NBO 06/02
ETD XMN 06/04
ETD YTN 06/05
ETA HOU 07/03
Resume to Normal Revised
05/14 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *EMC (NUE),
APL (AW4), CMA (Vespucci),
OOCL (ECC2), Cosco (AWE1),
EC – (P) M/V TBA
ETD TAO 06/04
ETD NBO 06/06
ETD SHA 06/08
ETD BUS 06/10
ETT SAV 07/03
Added
04/28 2020
23 The Alliance *Hapag , ONE, YML, HMM (EC5) EC – (S) M/V MOL Maneuver 052E
ETD LCB 006/06
ETD Caimep 06/08
ETD SG 06/10
ETD PKL 06/11
ETD Colomno 06/15
ETA NYC 07/06
Added
05/07 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (CPNW), OOCL (PNW4),
APL (NP2),CMA (TPX),
EMC (PE2),
PNW M/V TBA
ETD HKG 06/03
ETD YTN 06/05
ETD NBO 06/08
ETD SHA 06/10
ETA PRR 06/21
Added
05/08 2020
23 The Alliance *Hapag,* YML, *HMM, ONE , (PN3)
Blank on WK17/19/21/23/25
PNW M/V TBA
ETD HKG 06/01
ETD YTN 06/02
ETD SHA 06/06
ETD BUS 06/08
ETA YVR 06/19
Added
04/24 2020
23 The Alliance *ONE, Hapag , YML, HMM (PN4)
Blank on WK 17/19/21/23/25
PNW M/V TBA
ETD TAO 06/06
ETD NBO 06/08
ETD SHA 06/09
ETD BUS 06/13
ETA PRR 06/22
Added
04/24 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *OOCL (PCC1), Cosco (AAC4)
APL (CC9), CMA (HIX),  EMC (PCC1)
PSW M/V TBA
ETD NBO 06/07
ETD SHA 06/09
ETD BUS 06/11
ETA LGB 06/22
Added
05/08 2020
23 The Alliance *ONE, Hapag , YML , HMM (PS3) PSW M/V TBA
ETD NHV 06/06
ETD PIP 06/07
ETD COL 06/10
ETD PKL 06/14
ETD SG 06/17
ETD Caimep 06/20
ETD HPH 06/23
ETA LAX  07/08
Added
04/24 2020
23 Ocean Alliance *CMA (Columbus PNW), APL (WAX), 
OOCL (PNW2), Cosco (MPNW), EMC (NP1),
PNW M/V :
ETD SG  06/03
ETD YTN 06/09
ETD XMN 06/11
ETD NBO 06/12
ETD SHA 06/15
ETD BUS 06/18
ETA SEA 06/28
Added
05/14 2020
24 Ocean Alliance *CMA (PRX), APL (SC1),  
OOCL (PCS1), Cosco (AAS2)
EMC (PRX), Wanhai (CP3)
-Wef  ETD FUQ May 13 – New Route
PSW M/V TBA
ETD FUQ 06/10
ETD NSA 06/12
ETD YTN 06/13
ETD XMN 06/15
ETA LAX 06/29
Resume to Normal Revised
05/25 2020
24 The Alliance *YML, Hapag, ONE, HMM  (PS4) PSW M/V TBA
ETD XMN 06/13
ETD YTN 06/15
ETD KAO 06/16
ETD KEE 06/17
ETA LAX  06/30
Resume to Normal Revised
05/19 2020
24 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (GME)
CMA (GMX), EMC (GME), OOCL (GCC2)
EC – (P) M/V Cosco Auckland
ETD SHA 06/08
ETD NBO 06/09
ETD XMN 06/11
ETD YTN 06/12
ETA HOU 07/10
Added
05/14 2020
25 The Alliance *Hapag , ONE, YML, HMM (EC5) EC – (S) M/V MOL MIssion
ETD LCB 06/20
ETD Caimep 06/22
ETD SG 06/24
ETD PKL 06/25
ETD Colomno 06/29
ETA NYC 07/20
Added
05/07 2020
25 The Alliance *Hapag,* YML, *HMM, ONE , (PN3)
Blank on WK17/19/21/23/25
PNW M/V TBA
ETD HKG 06/15
ETD YTN 06/16
ETD SHA 06/20
ETD BUS 06/22
ETA YVR 07/03
Added
04/24 2020
25 The Alliance *ONE, Hapag , YML, HMM (PN4)
Blank on WK 17/19/21/23/25
PNW M/V TBA
ETD TAO 06/20
ETD NBO 06/22
ETD SHA 06/23
ETD BUS 06/27
ETA PRR 07/06
Added
04/24 2020
25 Ocean Alliance *EMC (TPA)
APL (SC8), CMA (JDX),
OOCL(PSW8), Cosco (AAS4)
-Wef  ETD HKG 05/03 – New Route
PSW M/V TBA
ETD HKG 06/21
ETD KAO 06/24
ETD TAIPEI 06/25
ETA LAX 07/08
Added
04/24 2020
25 Ocean Alliance *CMA (PRX), APL (SC1),  
OOCL (PCS1), Cosco (AAS2)
EMC (PRX), Wanhai (CP3)
-Wef  ETD FUQ May 13 – New Route
PSW M/V TBA
ETD FUQ 06/17
ETD NSA 06/19
ETD YTN 06/20
ETD XMN 06/22
ETA LAX 07/06
Added
04/24 2020
26 Ocean Alliance *EMC (NUE),
APL (AW4), CMA (Vespucci),
OOCL (ECC2), Cosco (AWE1),
EC – (P) M/V TBA
ETD TAO 06/25
ETD NBO 06/27
ETD SHA 06/29
ETD BUS 07/01
ETT SAV 07/24
Added
04/24 2020
26 The Alliance *YML, Hapag, ONE, HMM  (PS4) PSW M/V TBA
ETD XMN 06/27
ETD YTN 06/28
ETD KAO 06/30
ETD KEE 07/01
ETA LAX  07/14
Added
04/24 2020
27 Ocean Alliance *Cosco (GME)
CMA (GMX), EMC (GME), OOCL (GCC2)
EC – (P) M/V TBA
ETD SHA 06/29
ETD NBO 06/30
ETD XMN 07/02
ETD YTN 07/03
ETA HOU 07/31
Resume to Normal Revised
05/25 2020

We thank you for your understanding and continued support

The BOC Blast 362 – Capacity Cut By Blank Sailings

Additional List 4A Products Excluded from

China Tariff; Act Now for Retroactive Refunds

Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report | www.strtrade.com

Dozens of additional goods are being excluded from the Section 301 additional tariff (currently 7.5 percent) on List 4A goods from China. Importers of covered goods should act now to obtain refunds of Section 301 tariffs paid on such goods since Sept. 1, 2019.

For more information on this process, or on Section 301 tariffs in general, please contact Nicole Bivens Collinson, Marilyn-Joy Cerny, or Kristen Smith.

HTSUS numbers and products newly excluded from the List 4A tariff are as follows.

– HTSUS 5210.11.4040 (plain weave sheeting of cotton)

– HTSUS 5210.11.6020 (plain weave poplin or broadcloth of cotton)

– down of ducks or geese, not further worked than cleaned, disinfected, or treated for preservation, meeting both test standards 4 and 10.1 of Federal Standard 148a promulgated by the General Services Administration, with a fill power of at least 315 cm3/g but not more than 580 cm3/g (described in HTSUS 0505.10.0055)

– cyanuric chloride (IUPAC name: 2,4,6-trichloro-1,3,5-triazine) (CAS No. 108-77-0), 99.5 percent or higher in purity (described in HTSUS 2933.69.6010)

– kneeling pads of plastics (described in HTSUS 3924.90.5650)

– fittings of plastics, of a kind used to connect mop heads with mop handles (described in HTSUS 3926.90.9990)

– printed books in the Chinese language (other than dictionaries and encyclopedias, textbooks, directories, bibles, testaments, prayer books and other religious books, technical, scientific and professional books, art and pictorial books, hardbound books, and rack size paperbound books), containing 49 or more pages each (excluding covers) (described in HTSUS 4901.99.0093)

– women’s cut and sewn garden gloves, without fourchettes, cut and sewn from preexisting machine knitted fabric of polyester and cotton jersey, containing 50 percent or more by weight of rubber or plastics, clute cut (described in HTSUS 6116.10.4400)

– gloves cut and sewn of machine knitted fabric, without fourchettes, with applied polyvinyl chloride dots, such gloves containing 50 percent or more by weight of cotton, manmade fibers or wool, or any combination thereof and subject to manmade fiber restraints (described in HTSUS 6116.10.5520)

– gloves, containing less than 50 percent by weight of textile fibers, coated with rubber or plastics designed for enhanced grip (described in HTSUS 6116.10.6500)

– gloves, cut and sewn of knitted fabric in chief weight of polyester, not impregnated, coated or covered with plastics or rubber, without fourchettes (described in HTSUS 6116.93.8800)

– gloves of vegetable fibers, without fourchettes, with applied dots of polyvinyl chloride (described in HTSUS 6216.00.1720)

– shells for pillows and comforters made from microfiber fabric consisting of filament yarns not more than 1.22 decitex, such fabric with a weight of at least 55 g/m2 but not more than 155 g/m2 (described in HTSUS 6307.90.9889)

– round wire of nonalloy steel, hot-dipped galvanized with zinc, containing by weight less than 0.25 percent carbon, measuring at least 1.5 mm in diameter (described in HTSUS 7217.20.3000)

– ring binder mechanisms for loose-leaf binders, each measuring at least 132 mm but not more than 134 mm in length and at least 16 mm but not more than 18 mm in width, with two prongs seated underneath housing (described in HTSUS 8305.10.0010)

– three-way hand-operated valve part of brass, suitable for use as an input part on irrigation-grade valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.1000)

– lithium-ion batteries of a form other than size designations of the International Electrotechnical Commission or the American National Standards Institute, each producing not more than 45 V, with a capacity of at least 6,000 milliamp hours but not more than 10 A hours (described in HTSUS 8507.60.0020)

– optical channel splitters (capable of converting between electrical signals and multiplexed optical signals) (described in HTSUS 8517.62.0090)

– television liquid crystal display main board assemblies, each consisting of a printed circuit board containing a television tuner and audio and video components (described in HTSUS 8529.90.1300)

– safety spectacle frames of plastics conforming to Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards (described in HTSUS 9003.11.0000)

– spectacle frames of plastics conforming to Food and Drug Administration regulations as approved medical devices (described in HTSUS 9003.11.0000)

– spectacle frames, other than of plastics (described in HTSUS 9003.19.0000)

– LCD modules, not capable of receiving or processing a broadcast television signal, each with a video display diagonal measuring not more than 191 cm (described in HTSUS 9013.80.9000)

– watch cases of stainless steel and titanium, not gold- or silver-plated, unassembled, each measuring at least 20 mm but not more than 48 mm in diameter and weighing at least 50 g but not more than 250 g (described in HTSUS 9111.20.4000)

– wristwatch cases of stainless steel, not gold- or silver-plated, including the sapphire crystal, the crown, and the case back, each measuring at least 39 mm but not more than 41 mm in diameter and at least 8 mm but not more than 10 mm in thickness, weighing not more than 40 g (described in HTSUS 9111.20.4000)

– watch dials of brass, each measuring at least 18 mm but not exceeding 50 mm in width and weighing at least 10 g but not more than 20 g (described in HTSUS 9114.30.4000)

– wristwatch dials of copper, each measuring at least 33 mm but not more than 35 mm in diameter (described in HTSUS 9114.30.4000)

– wristwatch hands, presented in sets each containing three hands (second, minute, and hour) of copper, each hand measuring at least 10 mm but not more than 14 mm in length, faced with lume paint (described in HTSUS 9114.90.4000)

– parts of child safety seats (described in HTSUS 9401.90.1085)

– unfinished pads and seats for weight-training exercise machines (described in HTSUS 9506.91.0030)

– fish hooks, not snelled (described in HTSUS 9507.20.8000)

– mop heads of polyester and rayon, lint free, disposable (described in HTSUS 9603.90.8050)

– tufts of swine hair bristles, oriented with the soft feather tipped ends of the hairs facing up and the hard, root ends of the hairs facing down, with the root ends of the hairs glued together to form a round bottom not more than 7 mm in diameter, for incorporation into brushes (described in HTSUS 9603.90.8050)

– electrical spark lighters (described in HTSUS 9613.80.2090)

The scope of each exclusion is governed by the specified product description and not the descriptions found in any particular request.

These exclusions, which must be claimed using new HTSUS subheading 9903.88.49, will be retroactive to Sept. 1, 2019, and remain in place until Sept. 1, 2020. Importers may utilize these exclusions for any product that meets the descriptions above, even if they did not request it.

The BOC Blast 361 – More List 3 Products Excluded from China Tariff

More List 3 Products Excluded from

China Tariff; Act Now for Retroactive Refunds

Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report | www.strtrade.com

Dozens of additional goods are being excluded from the Section 301 additional 25 percent tariff on List 3 goods from China. These exclusions, which must be claimed using new HTSUS subheading 9903.88.48, will be retroactive to Sept. 24, 2018, and remain in place until Aug. 7, 2020.

Importers of covered goods should act now to obtain refunds of any tariffs paid on such goods since Sept. 24, 2018.

HTSUS numbers and products newly excluded from the List 3 tariff are as follows.

– HTSUS 0713.33.1040 (kidney beans)

– HTSUS 0713.50.1000 (broad beans)

– HTSUS 1207.70.0020 (cantaloupe seeds)

– HTSUS 1207.70.0040 (watermelon seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.30.0090 (flower seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.6010 (sweet pepper seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8010 (carrot seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8020 (radish seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8040 (cucumber seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8050 (lettuce seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8060 (squash seeds)

– HTSUS 1209.91.8070 (tomato seeds)

– HTSUS 2916.19.1000 (potassium sorbate)

– HTSUS 5603.14.9090, 5603.92.0090, and 5603.93.0090 (other nonwovens of manmade filaments)

– HTSUS 9403.70.4002 (plastic toddler beds, bassinets, and cradles)

– freeze-dried or frozen bloodworms, brine shrimp, shrimp, and tubifex worms used as pet feed (described in HTSUS 0511.91.0090)

– dried green seaweed used as pet feed (described in HTSUS 1212.29.0000)

– sodium permanganate in 40 percent aqueous solution (described in HTSUS 2841.69.0010)

– boron carbide in powder form (described in HTSUS 2849.90.1000)

– children’s acrylic paint sets, rock painting kits, and washable tempera paint kits (described in HTSUS 3213.10.0000)

– organic surface-active liquid for washing the skin (described in HTSUS 3401.30.5000)

– toilet seal rings of artificial or prepared waxes (described in HTSUS 3404.90.5150)

– artificial graphite, in powder or flake form, for manufacturing into the lithium-ion anode component of batteries (described in HTSUS 3801.10.5000)

– mixtures of ammonium ethyl carbamoylphosphonate and application adjuvants (described in HTSUS 3808.93.5050)

– refrigerant gas R-421B (described in HTSUS 3824.78.0020)

– silicon monoxide in powder form (described in HTSUS 3824.99.9297)

– washing machine tub seals of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (described in HTSUS 4016.93.5020)

– grommets of acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (described in statistical reporting number 4016.99.6050)

– handbags with outer surface of sheeting of plastics (described in HTSUS 4202.22.1500)

– coin purses with outer surface of laminated plastics (described in HTSUS 4202.32.1000)

– garment travel bags of man-made fibers (described in HTSUS 4202.92.3131)

– flooring planks (described in HTSUS 4411.13.2000)

– boxes of wood with hinged top, handle of base metals, and two clasps (described in HTSUS 4420.90.8000)

– wood dowel pins (described in HTSUS 4421.99.1500)

– polypropylene roofing underlayment (described in HTSUS 4602.90.0000)

– diaries presented in a kit also containing a pen and stickers (described in HTSUS 4820.10.2010)

– albums for samples or collections, put up for retail sale in kits also containing cards and envelopes, a glue stick, a stencil, a pair of scissors, stamps, sticker sheets, sparkling gemstones, markers, and pens (described in HTSUS 4820.50.0000)

– rugs of hand-knotted pile, of nylon and polypropylene (described in HTSUS 5701.90.1010)

– prepared painting canvas panel boards (described in HTSUS 5901.90.4000)

– equipment for scaffolding (described in HTSUS 7308.40.0000)

– empty steel drums and barrels (described in HTSUS 7310.10.0010)

– containers of stainless steel of a kind used for the conveyance of beer (described in HTSUS 7310.21.0025)

– screws of stainless steel (described in HTSUS 7318.15.8082)

– portable grills of iron or steel designed for use with both charcoal and propane as fuels (described in HTSUS 7321.11.1060)

– steel cover assemblies with side shields, steel drop-in cooktop assemblies, steel griddles, and steel drop-in burner box assemblies, comprising parts of stoves and ranges (described in HTSUS 7321.90.1000)

– tailor welded blanks of hot-formed steel sheets, cut into D-shaped form (described in HTSUS 7326.90.8688)

– water bottle art kits (described in HTSUS 7616.99.5190)

– tungsten carbide rock drilling core bits (described in HTSUS 8207.19.3060)

– pet identification tags of aluminum or chrome-coated brass (described in HTSUS 8302.49.4000)

– gun safes with digital keypads, of base metal (described in HTSUS 8303.00.0000)

– wind turbine hubs (described in HTSUS 8412.90.9081)

– upright coolers incorporating refrigerating equipment with one swing-type transparent glass door (described in HTSUS 8418.50.0080)

– fuel filters for internal combustion engines (described in HTSUS 8421.23.0000)

– shipping scales of aluminum (described in HTSUS 8423.81.0040)

– portal cranes, each with a jib or operating arm to extend horizontally from the crane and run on rails (described in HTSUS 8426.30.0000)

– self-regulating valves to control fuel pressure for automotive and marine applications (described in HTSUS 8481.80.9015)

– headlamp assemblies for passenger cars and trucks (described in HTSUS 8512.20.2040)

– battery holders for bicycle signaling apparatus (described in HTSUS 8512.90.2000)

– countertop ovens of stainless steel and plastic with convection, bake, steam, and broil functions (described in HTSUS 8516.60.4074)

– resonant circuit tags designed for use with a radio frequency surveillance system (described in HTSUS 8531.90.9001)

– die-cast aluminum alloy running boards for motor vehicles (described in HTSUS 8708.29.5060)

– unassembled non-upholstered chairs with metal frames with seats and backs having a shell of plastics or wood (described in HTSUS 9401.79.0050)

– floor-standing jewelry armoires with locking mechanism (described in HTSUS 9403.60.8081)

The scope of each exclusion is governed by the product description in the attached notice and not the descriptions found in any particular request.

These exclusions, which must be claimed using new HTSUS subheading 9903.88.48, will be retroactive to Sept. 24, 2018, and remain in place until Aug. 7, 2020. Importers may utilize these exclusions for any product that meets the descriptions in the USTR notice, even if they did not request it.

View Document(s):

The BOC Blast 360 – China Tariff Exclusions Updates

China Tariff Exclusions Updates

Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg Trade Report | www.strtrade.com

More China List 1 Tariff Exclusions Extended but Only for Six Months

These exclusions are available for any product that meets the specified product description, regardless of whether the importer filed an exclusion request.

The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative has extended the exclusion of the following products from the Section 301 additional 25 percent tariff on imports of List 1 goods from China.

– HTSUS 8481.10.0090 (other pressure-reducing valves)

– HTSUS 8483.50.9040 (other flywheels and pulleys)

– filtering or purifying machinery or apparatus of a kind used for waste water treatment (described in HTSUS 8421.21.0000)

– air purification equipment, electrically powered, weighing less than 36 kg (described in HTSUS 8421.39.8015)

– armatures designed for use in hydraulic solenoid valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– C-poles, of steel, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– metering spools, of aluminum, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– metering spools, of steel, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– poles, of steel, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– push pins, of steel, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– retainers, of steel, designed for use in hydraulic solenoid control valves (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– stereoscopic microscopes, not provided with a means for photographing the image, valued not over $500 per unit (described in HTSUS 9011.10.8000)

– adapter rings, tubes and extension sleeves, stands and arm assemblies, stages and gliding tables, eye guards and focusing racks, all the foregoing designed for use with compound optical microscopes (described in HTSUS 9011.90.0000)

These exclusions are available for any product that meets the specified product description, regardless of whether the importer filed an exclusion request. The scope of each exclusion is governed by the scope of the specified 10-digit HTSUS subheadings and product descriptions and not by the product descriptions in any particular request.

However, this extension of these exclusions is only valid until Dec. 31, not for an entire year as has previously been the case. USTR states that this shortened extension is due to “the cumulative effect of current and possible future exclusions or extensions of exclusions on the effectiveness of” the Section 301 tariffs. USTR explains that it has granted more than 6,200 exclusion requests to date, has extended some of these exclusions, and may consider further extensions. In addition, more than 8,600 exclusion requests are pending on List 4 goods. USTR states that it will take account of the cumulative effect of exclusions in considering the possible further extension of these and other exclusions.

On the other hand, the tariff exclusions granted in May 2019 for the following items are not being extended and will therefore expire May 14, at which point the 25 percent additional tariff will again be imposed on these goods.

– HTSUS 8407.21.0040 (outboard motors less than 22.38 kW)

– HTSUS 8427.10.4000 (rider-type, counterbalanced fork-lift trucks)

– HTSUS 8473.40.1000 (printed circuit assemblies for automatic teller machines)

– apparatus, including pitchers, bottles, and units designed for incorporation into refrigerators, appliances, or sink faucets, the foregoing fitted with filters for filtering or purifying water (described in HTSUS 8421.21.0000)

– filtering apparatus, fitted with pumps, designed for use in pools, spas, or similar contained bodies of water (described in HTSUS 8421.21.0000)

– submersible machinery for filtering water, designed for use in pools, basins, aquariums, spas, or similar contained bodies of water (described in HTSUS 8421.21.0000)

– water distillation machinery and apparatus not covered by heading 8419 (described in HTSUS 8421.21.0000)

– dust collection equipment for cement, minerals, and mining industries (described in HTSUS 8421.39.8015)

– apron-type chain conveyors (described in HTSUS 8428.39.0000)

– roller conveyors (described in HTSUS 8428.39.0000)

– vibrating conveyors (described in HTSUS 8428.39.0000)

– machinery for mixing beverages in single servings for direct human consumption, designed for use in commercial food service establishments (described in HTSUS 8438.80.0000)

– machinery for reconstituting single serving beverages for direct human consumption from frozen pre-packaged portions, designed for use in commercial food service establishments (described in HTSUS 8438.80.0000)

– housings designed for hydraulic ball valves, of cast iron or steel, each measuring 5.7 cm by 3.2 cm and weighing 0.528 kg (described in HTSUS 8481.90.9040)

– DC electric motors, of an output of less than 18.65 W, valued over $4, other than brushless (described in HTSUS 8501.10.4060)

– AC electric motors, multi-phase, of an output exceeding 14.92 kW but not exceeding 75 kW, other than for use in civil aircraft (described in HTSUS 8501.52.8040)

– coils, coil assemblies, and other parts of electromagnets (described in HTSUS 8505.90.7501)

– radio remote control apparatus for garage doors (described in HTSUS 8526.92.5000)

– radio remote control apparatus for pet collars and pet food dispensers (described in HTSUS 8526.92.5000)

– remote control devices, hand held and battery powered, designed for use with toy model vehicles and aircraft (described in HTSUS 8526.92.5000)

– bezels, covers, and housings designed for motor vehicle cameras (HTSUS 8529.90.8100)

– electromechanical relays, for a voltage exceeding 60 V but not over 250 V, with contacts rated at 10 A or more (described in HTSUS 8536.49.0075)

– push-button switches, rated at over 5 A, measuring no more than 2.9 cm by 2.9 cm by 2.9 cm, with 4 spade or brass terminals, with an actuator shaft with D-shaped cross section (described in HTSUS 8536.50.9035)

– push-button switches, rated at over 5 A, measuring no more than 4.8 cm by 2.8 cm by 2.8 cm, with 2 spade or brass terminals (described in HTSUS 8536.50.9035)

– push-button switches, rated at over 5 A, measuring no more than 5 cm by 1.7 cm by 1.9 cm, with 2 spade or brass terminals, with an actuator shaft with D-shaped cross section (described in HTSUS 8536.50.9035)

– snap-action switches, each designed for installation in a wall-mounted enclosure or electrical box (described in HTSUS 8536.50.9040)

– ultraviolet or infrared LED light therapy devices for the professional treatment of pain or of ailments of the skin (described in HTSUS 9018.20.0040)

China Announces Second Round of Tariff Exclusions for U.S. Goods

China announced May 12 the second round of exclusions from its additional 25 percent tariff on imports of U.S. goods. These exclusions apply to 79 products (see attached for a complete list), including rare earth mineral ores, aircraft radar equipment, semiconductor parts, medical disinfectants, and various precious metals and chemical and petrochemical products.

These exclusions will be effective from May 19, 2020, to May 18, 2021. Importers of record will be eligible for refunds of the additional tariffs paid on these goods and will have six months to apply.

For U.S. goods still subject to China’s additional tariffs, there are alternatives to mitigate the impact. These include applying for market-based exclusion, restructuring global supply chains, etc.

View Document(s):

China exclusion list

The BOC Blast 359 – 90-Day Duty Tax and Fee Postponement-

90-Day Duty, Tax, and Fee Postponement

On April 22nd, 2020 CBP is publishing the 90 Day postponement for certain estimated duties, taxes, and fees. As CBP does have a scheduled publication date, BOC wanted to notify our Importers. Below is the link to the Federal Register document. Please review the FR notice tomorrow, to ensure compliance. 

https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2020/04/22/2020-08618/temporary-postponement-of-the-time-to-deposit-certain-estimated-duties-taxes-and-fees-during-the

CSMS #42423171 – COVID-19 – 90 Day Postponement of Payment for the Deposit of Certain Estimated Duties, Taxes, and Fees

BOC will need to receive the below statement on your company’s letterhead and signed by a corporate officer.

(Company name, IRS#)                                        confirms that it satisfies CBP requirements for the 90-day postponement of payment for imports duty, taxes and fees.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, local, state and national restrictions have caused significant financial hardship, (Company name) has an order from competent governmental authority. (Company name) has verified that our operation is fully or partially suspended during March 2020 or April 2020. The gross receipts for March 13-31, 2020 or April 2020 are less than 60 percent of the gross receipts for the comparable period in 2019. We have verified that our entries are not antidumping duties, countervailing duties, section 232 tariffs for steel and aluminum imports, section 201 tariff rate quotas for solar cells and panels and/or section 301 tariff for products of China.

REQUIREMENTS / ELIGIBLE & NOT ELIGIBLE PRODUCT

  1. Importer must have significant financial hardship
  1. If operations fully or partially suspended during March 2020 OR April 2020, the suspended operations must be due to orders from a competent government authority limiting commerce, travel, or group meeting due to COVID-19. 
  • AND such suspension resulted in the gross receipts for March 13-31, 2020 OR April 2020 are less than 60% of the gross receipts for the comparable period in 2019
  • AND eligible importers do not need to file documents with CBP to be eligible for this relief
  1. BUT must maintain documentation as part of its books
  1. AND records establishing that it meets the requirements for relief
  1. ALSO CBP may conduct a review of documentation at a future date to ensure compliance.
  • Temporary postponement does not apply to any entry / withdrawal from warehouse for consumption
  1. No antidumping duties
  • No countervailing duties
  • No section 232 tariffs for steel and aluminum imports
  • No section 201 tariff rate quotas for solar cells and panels
  • No section 301 tariff for products of China
  • Entries NOT eligible if the entry summary includes merchandise subject to ADD, CVD, section 232, section 201 and section 301.

The importer will need to take the commercial invoice and document the commodities NOT eligible for the 90-day postponement. BOC will not be responsible and will be charging two entry fees for the two separate entries. BOC is charging a $ 150.00 flat clearance fee for the commodities not under the 90-day postponement, and the importer’s clearance fee for the consumption entries that quality for the 90 days. 

  1. Separate entries pursuant to 19 CFR 141.52 has been authorized by CBP
  1. Only applies to entries NOT yet filed
  1. If an importer has merchandise not eligible and merchandise eligible on the same AMS B/L, two separate entries can be made

PAYMENT TIMEFRAMES

Estimated duties, taxes, and fees paid on single pay basis or Daily Statement may be postponed up to 90 days from the payment due date.

Example:

Original Due Date                               90-Day Postponement

April 30, 2020                                        July 29, 2020

Estimated Internal Revenue Tax paid via the deferred tax schedule may be postponed up to three months from the payment due date.

Example:

Original Due Date                               3 Month Postponement

April 29, 2020                                        July 29, 2020

May 14, 2020                                         August 14, 2020

Estimated duties and fees paid via Periodic Monthly Statement (PMS) may be postponed up to three months, as defined by the 15th working day of the third month.

Example:

Original Due Date                               3 Month Postponement

April 21, 2020                                        July 22, 2020

May 21, 2020                                         August 21, 2020

PAYMENT INSTRUCTIONS

The authorization of 90 additional calendar days without penalty for payment applies whether an entry summary is paid as a single-pay check, ACH Daily and Monthly Statement, or PMS.  

Importers/Filers who choose to take advantage of the additional 90 calendar days for the payment of the deposit of estimated duties, taxes and fees have the responsibility to schedule payments accordingly. CBP will not adjust statement dates.

Effective Sunday, April 19, 2020, CBP is deploying updates to the ACE SU statement transaction to give the importer/filer more flexibility when removing entries from a PMS:

  1. Entries removed from statement no longer have to be submitted as single pay. The importer/filer can reschedule entries that were removed from one statement for another statement.
  • The importer/filer can now remove Remote Location Filing (RLF) entries from a PMS, including the April PMS, and schedule those entries for another statement.
  • The importer/filer can now schedule the month further out than two months, so that they do not have to further push the Periodic Daily Statement (PDS) date. This will allow the importer/filer to file an entry with an April PDS date and schedule for the July monthly statement.

The BOC Blast 358 – Blank Sailings Updated on 4-3-20

Blank Sailings Updated on 4-3-20

ALLIANCE LANE SERVICE ROUTING ETD
SHENZHEN
OA PSW COSCO/APL/EMC/OOCL/CMA
AAS/SC6/PVCS/PVCS/SCS
VUNG TAU-HONGKONG-YANTIAN-KAOHSIUNG-LGB 21-Apr-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP88/PELICAN/ASUS6/ZGX
XIAMEN-YANTIAN-HOUSTON-MOBILE-TAMPA 20-Apr-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP16/EMERALD/ASUS3/ZSA
XIAMEN-KAOHSIUNG-YANTIAN-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-SAVANNAH-NORFOLK-CHARLESTON-NEWARK 25-Apr-20
ALLIANCE LANE SERVICE ROUTING ETD
SHANGHAI
2M PSW MSK/MSC/HBS/SML
TP8/ORIENT/UPAS1/PS1
QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-BUSAN-LGB-OAKLAND 24-Apr-20
OA PNW+PSW COSCO/APL/CMA/EMC/OOCL
CEN/CC2/BOHAI/CEN/PCN1
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-LGB-SEATTLE-PRINCE RUPERT 10-May-20
OA PSW COSCO/APL/CMA/EMC/OOCL
AAC4/CC9/HIX/PCC1/PCC1
NINGBO-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-LGB 12-May-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP16/EMERALD/ASUS3/ZSA
XIAMEN-KAOHSIUNG-YANTIAN-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-SAVANNAH-NORFOLK-CHARLESTON-NEWARK 25-Apr-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP10/AMBERJACK/ASUS1/ZCP
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-NINGBO-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-SAVANNAH-CHARLESTON-WILMINGTON-JACKSONVILLE 14-May-20
ALLIANCE LANE SERVICE ROUTING ETD
HONG KONG
OA PSW COSCO/APL/EMC/OOCL/CMA
AAS/SC6/PVCS/PVCS/SCS
VUNG TAU-HONGKONG-YANTIAN-KAOHSIUNG-LGB 20-Apr-20
ALLIANCE LANE SERVICE ROUTING ETD
QINGDAO
OA PNW+PSW COSCO/APL/CMA/EMC/OOCL
CEN/CC2/BOHAI/CEN/PCN1
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-LGB-SEATTLE-PRINCE RUPERT 06-May-20
2M PSW MSK/MSC/HBS/SML
TP8/ORIENT/UPAS1/PS1
QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-BUSAN-LGB-OAKLAND 22-Apr-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP10/AMBERJACK/ASUS1/ZCP
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-NINGBO-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-SAVANNAH-CHARLESTON-WILMINGTON-JACKSONVILLE 10-May-20
           
ALLIANCE LANE SERVICE ROUTING ETD
NINGBO
2M PSW MSK/MSC/HBS/SML
TP8/ORIENT/UPAS1/PS1
QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-BUSAN-LGB-OAKLAND 26-Apr-20
OA PSW COSCO/APL/CMA/EMC/OOCL
AAC4/CC9/HIX/PCC1/PCC1
NINGBO-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-LGB 10-May-20
OA PNW+PSW COSCO/APL/CMA/EMC/OOCL
CEN/CC2/BOHAI/CEN/PCN1
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-SHANGHAI-NINGBO-LGB-SEATTLE-PRINCE RUPERT 11-May-20
2M AWR MSK/MSC/HBS/ZIM
TP10/AMBERJACK/ASUS1/ZCP
TIANJIN-QINGDAO-NINGBO-SHANGHAI-BUSAN-SAVANNAH-CHARLESTON-WILMINGTON-JACKSONVILLE 12-May-20

The BOC Blast 357 – US ports, warehouses stay open

COVID-19 Freight Update: US ports, warehouses stay open.

JOC Staff | Mar 20, 2020 5:40PM EDT

As the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) deepens in the United States, major ports, warehouses, and freight transportation providers are telling customers they will remain open as they are deemed essential services by the government

Essential staff supporting the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, including longshore workers and drayage drivers, for example, are exempt from California Governor Gavin Newsom’s Thursday “shelter-in-place” order.  

The Southern California ports issued statements on Friday emphasizing that since they handle a wide range of critical cargoes from medical supplies to basic consumer staples, both the state and county of Los Angeles regulators have exempted port and supply chain activities from stay-at-home mandates.

Noel Hacegaba, deputy executive director and chief operating officer at the Port of Long Beach, said the ports have lobbied the county and state on behalf of all supply chain participants.

“Specifically, we have requested that ports be classified as essential infrastructure and businesses that are part of the end-to-end supply chain be classified as essential operations in order to ensure full benefit to the economy,” Hacegaba said.

Gene Seroka, executive director of the Port of Los Angeles, said that with 12 container terminals and extensive container yard acreage, the neighboring ports are able to remain “nimble” and shift freight volume around throughout the largest US port complex as needed.

For example, vessel-sharing alliances call at multiple terminals in the port complex, so the terminals are able to handle cargo surges by sharing the load. Also, the ports and terminals will be able to respond to interruptions due to health emergencies, such as a worker testing positive for COVID-19, as happened Thursday in Houston. 

Seroka said the ports have met with the chief medical adviser for Los Angeles County and developed a safety protocol and a contingency plan in the event of an emergency.

The International Longshore & Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association, which represents shipping lines and terminal operators, have worked out their own safety protocol, which includes social distancing and a greater reliance on electronic dispatching when possible, said James McKenna, PMA president. 

The Harbor Trucking Association in Southern California on Friday emphasized the exemption that the supply chain logistics industry has from Gov. Gavin Newsom’s stay-at-home order.

“By order of the governor, port operations, manufacturing and distribution are considered critical and essential, as part of America’s supply chain, which must continue,” the HTA stated.

The HTA’s daily update on the COVID-19 disruption on Thursday listed the broad range of industry workers who will continue to work in the current environment. 

“Employees supporting or enabling transportation functions, including dispatchers, maintenance and repair technicians, warehouse workers, truck stop and rest area workers, and workers that maintain and inspect infrastructure, including those that require cross-border travel,” the HTA said.

In a Friday statement, the Port of Oakland reaffirmed its status as a provider of essential services, and ILWU Local 10 tweeted it will would be taking safety precautions while it continued to move cargo through the port. 

East, Gulf coasts ports adjust 

Like in California, the Port of Charleston in South Carolina is exempt from a stay-at-home order issued Thursday by the mayor of Mount Pleasant, where the Wando Welch Terminal is located. All terminal staff, truck drivers, and workers at nearby off-dock rail ramps are considered essential employees, as are warehouse workers handling cargo.

The ports of Virginia, Wilmington (N.C.), Charleston, Jacksonville, Everglades are open normal hours. In Savannah, terminal hours remain the same Monday through Friday, but Saturday gate hours have been canceled through mid-April.

In New Jersey, Governor Phil Murphy on Friday said he is looking at closing non-essential businesses in the state, to halt the spread of the COVID-19. However, as in other states, port workers likely will not be affected.

The closure of the Port of Houston on Wednesday night after the port administration learned that a part-time truck driver who worked at the port’s two main container terminals — Barbours Cut Container Terminal and Bayport Container Terminal — had tested positive for the COVID-19 highlighted the difficulty of ensuring infected employees do not come to work. The terminals reopened Thursday evening after the port authority said an investigation determined the truck driver’s exposure to others “was fairly limited.” 

Ensuring that infected employees don’t come to work is no easy task, however. In Houston, for example, the employee only learned he tested positive several days after he had worked at the terminals.

The Seagirt Marine Terminal in Baltimore has closed twice this month because of lack of volume. Miami’s South Florida Container Terminal was closed Friday and the Port Miami Terminal Operating Co. will be closed Monday and Tuesday also because of low volume.

The Port of NY & NJ Is Open

(https://www.panynj.gov/port/en/index.html

The Port is open and operating under normal conditions amid the unfolding health crisis associated with COVID-19. Our supply chain partners from the marine terminal operators and longshore labor to truckers and warehouse and distribution center operators are working hard to help sustain our economy and support the 28 million consumers in the local region that are dependent on the Port during this difficult time.